In physics, the kinetic energy of an object is the energy that it possesses due to its motion. It is defined as the work needed to accelerate a body of a given mass from rest to its stated velocity. Having gained this energy during its acceleration, the body maintains this kinetic energy unless its speed changes.

“Kinetic art” can be dated back to the 19th century impressionist artists such as Monet, Degas and Manet who originally experimented with movement in human figures on canvas. The artwork itself was more lifelike than their contemporaries. By the 20th century the surrealist painters such as Jackson Pollock took on their own forms of kinetic art. Pollocks drip and splatter techniques developed into what would be known as action painting. By the late 1950’s and well into the 1960’s artists such as Alexander Calder took this one step further. Calder for example, took to the creation of mobiles, a type of moving sculpture made with carefully balanced and suspended shapes that move accordingly to it’s air surroundings. He would go on to create mobiles that were stationary called stabiles.
Kinetics continues to be found in all forms of contemporary art. From animations, sculptures, digital manipulations and even paintings. Movement of all velocities will inspire art of all generations. Ki-net-ic aims to display the continuation and current state of this long standing art movement. From Sui Park’s Mostly Cloudy  mobiles to Mike Sorgatz fast paced New York landscapes. Anthony Tino’s glitch series and Ben Garthus’s moving tile prints will all be represented. A celebration of the collective consciousness in one space in one moment of time. The exhibit runs until March 18th.
Opening Reception
Friday February 5, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
371 Court Street, 2nd Floor, Brooklyn NY 11231